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Archive for June, 2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Jason Kidd had a seat in the coaching box and a jersey in the rafters.

He wanted more. And now his celebrated return to the Nets has turned into yet another ugly exit.

Kidd is set to become Milwaukee’s coach after Brooklyn agreed to a deal Monday with the Bucks, who paved the way for Kidd’s arrival by firing coach Larry Drew.

The Nets will receive second-round draft picks in 2015 and 2019. They said a search for a new coach would begin immediately.

Kidd went 44-38 in his only season as Nets coach, but then sought control of the basketball operations department and was denied. The Nets gave him permission to talk to other teams about a job.

It was a stunningly quick ending to Kidd’s reunion with the franchise he twice led to the NBA Finals as a player. The Nets hired him last June as coach just weeks after he retired as a player and retired his No. 5 before a preseason game in October. Also, he bought a small portion of the team.

There was no reason to believe he wouldn’t be back Thursday when he appeared at a press conference where the Nets announced plans for their new practice facility.

But things rarely ended cleanly for Kidd throughout his Hall of Fame-worthy career, and that remains the case as a coach. He was traded from Dallas, his first pro team, when he feuded with teammates. He was shipped out of Phoenix after an arrest for a domestic dispute.

And though he led the Nets to the 2002 and ’03 NBA Finals and remained a franchise icon, he soured on the team during the 2007-08 season, and the franchise dealt him back to Dallas.

But as much as the current ownership may have liked him, it wasn’t interested in positioning Kidd above general manager Billy King and giving him the power he sought. King is scheduled to address the media on Tuesday.

Drew went 15-67 in his only season in Milwaukee, but there had been no indication he wouldn’t be back before the Kidd situation emerged.

“Despite the challenging season, Larry always handled himself and represented the Bucks in a first-class manner,” Bucks general manager John Hammond said in a statement. “Larry did the best he could in a difficult situation, especially given all of our injuries. I want to thank Larry for all of his efforts, and we wish him the best of luck in his future endeavors.”

Milwaukee had the NBA’s worst record last season and is under new co-owners in Marc Lasry and Wes Edens. Lasry and Kidd are friends.

The Nets could choose from a number of quality coaches who are available, including Lionel Hollins, George Karl and Mark Jackson.

They bypassed experience when they chose Kidd last summer, and the results were ugly early. Kidd removed Lawrence Frank from the bench after lobbying for the Nets to hire his former coach as his lead assistant, and then was fined $50,000 by the NBA after intentionally spilling a drink on the court to delay a game.

The Nets started 10-21 with a high-priced, high-expectations team, though regrouped to reach the second round of the playoffs. Kidd won two Eastern Conference coach of the month honors for engineering a turnaround with a small-ball lineup after center Brook Lopez was lost to a broken foot.

He departs Brooklyn now with free agency opening Tuesday and key Nets Paul Pierce and Shaun Livingston set to hit the market.

Lasry and Edens had said in announcing the purchase of the team in April that they would evaluate the organization. Lasry spoke to a meeting of Milwaukee-area journalists and business leaders on June 23, before the draft, and afterward told The Associated Press that they were still in the evaluation process.

But the new ownership group had given no indication that Drew or Hammond might be in trouble after the franchise’s worst season in former U.S. Sen. Herb Kohl’s last year as team owner. Hammond spearheaded the NBA draft evaluation process that landed Milwaukee a potential superstar in Duke forward Jabari Parker with the second overall pick.

Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Jake Arrieta tips his cap as he gets a standing ovation from Red Sox fans after carrying a no-hitter to the eighth inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Monday, June 30, 2014. Boston Red Sox's Stephen Drew broke up his bid with a single in the eighth inning. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Chicago Cubs starting pitcher Jake Arrieta tips his cap as he gets a standing ovation from Red Sox fans after carrying a no-hitter to the eighth inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston, Monday, June 30, 2014. Boston Red Sox’s Stephen Drew broke up his bid with a single in the eighth inning. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

BOSTON (AP) — Jake Arrieta certainly picked two of baseball’s most historic places to put on memorable performances.

Arrieta held the Red Sox hitless until Stephen Drew singled with two outs in the eighth inning, and the Chicago Cubs beat the Boston Red Sox 2-0 on Monday night in the opener of only the second series between the teams at Fenway Park since 1918.

Six days after losing a perfect game on a leadoff single in the seventh inning of his previous start at Wrigley Field against Cincinnati, Arrieta took his no-hit bid a little deeper at Fenway. He allowed only Mike Napoli’s fifth-inning walk before Drew lined a sharp single to right.

“It’s special to do it in this ballpark,” Arrieta said. “It was special to do it last week in Wrigley and to do it here in these two parks is pretty special.”

Starting the season on the disabled list with shoulder tightness, the 28-year old right-hander was pushing his pitch limit before Drew lined a 2-2 pitch.

Arrieta (5-1) was lifted by Cubs manager Rick Renteria immediately following the hit that came on his career-high 120th pitch.

The 28-year-old Arrieta was given a loud ovation before he even got to the foul line, tipping his cap to the Boston crowd. He tipped it again after crossing the line.

“Something like that in Fenway is pretty rare for an opposing team, so yeah I got some goosebumps there,” he said. “That’s why you play this game, for moments like that. I was very thankful to be a part of something like that.”

Arrieta fanned 10 in just his 11th start of the season.

“Awesome. That was some kind of awesome,” Renteria said of the ovation. “We were standing out there at the mound. That was some show of respect.”

Drew’s hit ensured the Red Sox wouldn’t be no-hit for the first time since Cubs pitching coach Chris Bosio pitched a no-no against Boston in 1993 for Seattle.

Arrieta’s performance helped jog Bosio’s memory of his special night.

“Everything,” Bosio said when asked what he recalled from his no-hitter. “We had just come off a long road trip from Detroit and Toronto and I was real sick before the game. I had cut my warmup in half. I pretty much remember everything from the game. Every play, every at-bat right up until the last out.”

Hector Rondon allowed a pinch-hit single to A.J. Pierzynski leading off the ninth before finishing the two-hitter for his 10th save.

“Three above-average pitches with above average command,” Boston manager John Farrell said of Arrieta. “A lot of power to his fastball. Stayed out of the middle of the plate. He was outstanding.”

Nate Schierholtz hit a two-run homer for Chicago.

Jake Peavy (1-7) is winless in his last 12 starts. He gave up two runs on five hits, walking two and striking out seven in six innings.

In just the second regular season series at Fenway between the clubs since Boston won the 1918 World Series in six games, Arrieta mixed his pitches by combining a sharp cutter and curve with an above-average fastball.

“He located everything. He’s got great stuff,” Boston’s Dustin Pedroia said. “He kept every pitch out of the zone. I had three at-bats and I don’t think I got one good pitch to hit.”

The Red Sox, who arrived in Boston around 4 a.m. after a win Sunday night in New York against the Yankees, really didn’t have anything close to a hit before Drew’s brought up a roar from the crowd.

Arrieta fell behind Napoli 3-0 before getting a called strike. Napoli then fouled a pitch off before drawing a walk on the next pitch. Xander Bogaerts lined to left after Napoli’s walk.

Arrieta, who started the season on the disabled list with the shoulder tightness, made his first start of the season on May 3.

He’s been spectacular in June. Coming in, he allowed just four runs and 20 hits in 31 2-3 innings, winning his three previous starts.

The Cubs took a 2-0 lead in the fourth when Welington Castillo walked and Schierholtz followed with his homer into Boston’s bullpen.

Arrieta was acquired by the Cubs last July along with right-hander Pedro Strop from Baltimore for pitcher Scott Feldman, catcher Steve Clevenger and two international signing bonus slots.

The last time Boston was no-hit at home, Ted Williams flied out to right field for the final out of Detroit ace Jim Bunning’s gem on July 20, 1958 in the opener of a doubleheader.

Germany's Mesut Ozil, left, and teammate Andre Schuerrle (9) celebrate after Germany defeated Algeria 2-1 in extra time during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between Germany and Algeria at the Estadio Beira-Rio in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Monday, June 30, 2014. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

Germany’s Mesut Ozil, left, and teammate Andre Schuerrle (9) celebrate after Germany defeated Algeria 2-1 in extra time during the World Cup round of 16 soccer match between Germany and Algeria at the Estadio Beira-Rio in Porto Alegre, Brazil, Monday, June 30, 2014. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil (AP) — When it comes to the knockout stages of the World Cup, wins are worth more than style.

That was on full display Monday when Germany labored to a 2-1 extra-time win over an aggressive Algeria side to reach the tournament’s quarterfinals for the ninth consecutive time.

“You don’t have to play fantastic every match,” Germany coach Joachim Loew said. “You have to win.”

All three goals came in extra time after Algeria dominated for long stretches during the opening 90 minutes. Germany substitute Andre Schuerrle scored in the 92nd minute and Mesut Ozil made it 2-0 in the 120th before substitute Abdelmoumene Djabou pulled one back in injury time for Algeria.

Three-time champion Germany will next face 1998 winner France on Friday at the Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro.

“It was a victory of will power,” Loew said. “We had major problems in the first half to organize the way we played. We made simple mistakes, which invited the opponents to start counterattacks.”

Germany finally took the lead when Thomas Mueller provided a cross from the left flank that was slightly behind Schuerrle. The Germany forward dragged his left leg and backheeled the ball into the far corner, leaving goalkeeper Rais M’Bolhi with no chance.

With the temperature a chilly 14 degrees Celsius (57 degrees Fahrenheit) and a light rain falling at times, the pace was high at the Estadio Beira-Rio but the goals didn’t come until the end.

“Yes, we had our problems but at the end we were better and had a lot of chances,” Loew said. “The important thing is to advance. … Past champions also did not play well every match. You cannot play fantastic every match of the tournament.”

Ozil thought he had put the result out of reach when he pounded in a rebound after a shot from Schuerrle was cleared off the line by defender Esseid Belkalem, but Djabou volleyed in a minute later to make the last seconds count.

Perhaps inspired by the “Disgrace of Gijon” at the 1982 World Cup, when Germany and Austria supposedly conspired to oust Algeria in the group stage, the northern African nation outmatched Germany’s intensity for long stretches in an entertaining match.

Algeria was playing in the second round of the World Cup for the first time and thought it had taken the lead before a goal from Islam Slimani was waved off for offside in the 17th, one of many opportunities for the Algeria striker.

“We fell just short,” said Rais, who was voted man of the match. “That’s why we’re disappointed, because we think more was possible tonight.”

At the start of the second half, Germany put Schuerrle on for Mario Goetze in an attacking midfield and came out better organized.

In the 55th, Germany captain Philipp Lahm unleashed a hard shot that an outstretched Rais did well to push wide with his fingertips.

Still, Algeria continued to produce dangerous counterattacks. In the 72nd, Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer had to come out of his area to head away the danger with Slimani chasing.

In the 88th, Germany’s inability to find the target turned theatrical for a moment when Mueller appeared to fall during a free kick.

Then the goals came, the rain intensified, and Germany took control.

LONDON (AP) — As the rain wreaks havoc on the Wimbledon schedule and players start to complain, Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic have found little reason to worry about the weather.

It helped that both got to play Monday on Centre Court, the only spot at the All England Club with a retractable roof.

And with back-to-back, straight-set victories, they moved closer to a semifinal showdown that would be a rematch of the final last year, when Murray beat Djokovic to become the first British man since 1936 to win Wimbledon.

“Sometimes the scheduling works in your favor. Sometimes the weather works in your favor,” Murray said. “You just have to deal with it.”

He reached the quarterfinals for the seventh consecutive year by dulling the dangerous serve of 20th-seeded Kevin Anderson and saving a set point in the tiebreaker of a 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (6) win. They played under a drizzle for about 15 minutes before the roof was closed early in the second set.

It stayed that way for the top-seeded Djokovic, and the 2011 champion beat No. 14 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga for the 11th consecutive time, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (5). Djokovic grimaced once in the final set while clutching the upper left arm he landed on in his prior match, but finished strongly and said afterward he felt fine.

“A lot of matches were canceled, but that’s London, that’s Wimbledon, with its very unpredictable weather,” Djokovic said.

Murray, who hasn’t dropped a set, said: “They should always try to play with the roof open, because it’s an outdoor event.”

Easy for him to say.

Australian Open champion Stan Wawrinka was less than pleased that his third-round match was put off from Saturday to Monday (Wimbledon tries to avoid playing on its middle Sunday). He got through it quickly, defeating 45th-ranked Denis Istomin 6-3, 6-3, 6-4 in less than 1 1/2 hours.

Afterward, the fifth-seeded Wawrinka noted it won’t be easy to win five best-of-five-set matches in a week if he’s going to claim the title.

“For sure, I was disappointed,” Wawrinka said about not getting on court Saturday, when showers disrupted play for several hours. “You cannot do anything. You have to accept (it). They do what they want, and you just follow.”

Asked whether he spoke with officials, Wawrinka said: “They just say what’s going to be the schedule and that’s it. Even if you want to talk to them, they’re not going to change anything. They don’t listen (to) the player. They just do what they think is good for them.”

All England Club spokesman Johnny Perkins said the process was explained to Wawrinka’s coach, including that having past major champions on larger courts is more of a priority than getting all matches completed on a given day.

The start of Week 2 at Wimbledon is called “Manic Monday,” because it usually has all 16 fourth-round matches after taking Sunday off.

“I understand why Wawrinka was complaining, because we have this tradition here of the middle Sunday. … We have to rethink (that),” Djokovic said. “We all know that tradition is something that is nurtured here … and we respect that. But there are some rules that I believe should be updated.”

Wawrinka will be on No. 2 Court on Tuesday — when, by the way, the forecast calls for a slight chance of rain — against No. 19 Feliciano Lopez, who eliminated the last American singles player, No. 9 John Isner, 6-7 (8), 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 7-5. It’s the first time in 103 years that no U.S. men or women reached the round of 16 at Wimbledon.

Like Wawrinka, Isner didn’t take well to having his match postponed. He tried protesting, to no avail.

“They had their reasons,” Isner said.

Maria Sharapova never got a chance to play at all Monday, because her fourth-rounder against No. 9 Angelique Kerber was postponed. That was rescheduled for Tuesday, and the winner must play Wednesday against No. 13 Eugenie Bouchard, the first Canadian in the Wimbledon quarterfinals in the 46-year Open era.

These quarterfinals are set: Murray vs. No. 11 Grigor Dimitrov, and Djokovic vs. No. 26 Marin Cilic in the men’s bracket; 2011 champion Petra Kvitova vs. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, and No. 22 Ekaterina Makarova vs. No. 23 Lucie Safarova in the women’s.

Bouchard advanced with a 7-6 (5), 7-5 victory over No. 25 Alize Cornet, the Frenchwoman who beat Serena Williams.

“I believe in myself. Every match I play, I believe I can win,” said the 20-year-old Bouchard, the only woman who was a 2014 semifinalist at the Australian Open and French Open. “I’ve proved to myself I can play on the big stage.”

by Tom Benyo

Cat and Dog Tournament

Strong competitive golfers were the order of the day for the All Ages Cat and Dog tournament this year. Half of the field shot par or better. To place in the 3 flight format a team had to shoot at least a 74. All three flights had to be broken by the Payne Method. Two 66’s led the Championship Flight. Tyler and Tabitha Newton won first over Carl and Bev Hicks. The A flight was led by 3 70’s and first place went to Ted and Kathy Noirfalise. Tom and Linda Benyo took second place. The B Flight was won by Kenneth Koontz and Patsy Wyatt who Payned out Devon and Cheri Foster. Both teams shot a 74.

One of the drawing cards for this tournament was a drawing for two sets of St. Louis Cardinal tickets provided by “Ozark Radio Network”. The lucky winners were Terry Amos and Ginny Hyde and The Foster’s, Devon and Cheri.

Hole prizes were area golf course certificates. Long drive winners were Angie Barton, Terry Amos and Steve Coatney. Closest to the pin winners were Larry Prichard, Patsy Wyatt, Chuck Swift. Longest putt winners were Bev Hicks and Michele McDaniel.

Leagues

Rain eliminated the Casual League but he Cat and Dog was able to play. Winners were Tabitha and Tyler Newton with a 32, Sherri Unger and Steve Coatney with a 34 and Patsy Wyatt and Farrell Graves with a 38. Winner of the closest to the pin was Kenneth “Big Daddy” Koontz.

St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Shelby Miller throws against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first inning of a baseball game on Sunday, June 29, 2014, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

St. Louis Cardinals starting pitcher Shelby Miller throws against the Los Angeles Dodgers in the first inning of a baseball game on Sunday, June 29, 2014, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Alex Gallardo)

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The St. Louis Cardinals’ years of modest success against Clayton Kershaw seemed like ancient history while the Dodgers’ left-hander mowed them down on Sunday.

And after Los Angeles’ pitching staff allowed just four runs in four games against the defending NL champions, the Cardinals were simply grateful to get out of Chavez Ravine.

Kershaw struck out 13 during seven innings of five-hit ball, and Andre Ethier hit a three-run homer in the Dodgers’ 6-0 victory.

The last time the Cardinals faced Kershaw, they battered Los Angeles’ ace on the way to a win in the NL Championship Series. Although Kershaw had a sub-.500 career record against St. Louis before this victory, the two-time Cy Young winner followed outstanding performances by Josh Beckett and Zack Greinke earlier in the series with his own afternoon of dominance.

“I think we have to be pretty honest about how that pitching staff is throwing right now,” St. Louis manager Mike Matheny said. “They’re throwing the ball well, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that we can’t walk out of here with more wins than losses. We just didn’t stack together the kind of hits that we needed.”

Kershaw (9-2) extended his career-best scoreless streak to 28 innings in his first home start since throwing his first no-hitter June 18 against Colorado. He went 6-0 with an 0.82 ERA in June, yielding four runs in 44 innings and striking out 61.

The Dodgers took three of four from St. Louis in a rematch of last season’s NLCS. Ethier capped Los Angeles’ four-run fifth inning with a shot to right off Shelby Miller (7-7) for his first homer since May 27.

Matt Carpenter had three hits for the Cardinals, who were shut out twice in the four-game series.

“We had a couple of guys on with leadoff hits, and the next thing you know, they’re still standing on the bag they started on,” Matheny said. “A couple of times we had guys in scoring position, but (Kershaw) just wasn’t giving us much. He’s locked in.”

Indeed, St. Louis had little chance on another vintage day for Kershaw, who hasn’t allowed a run since June 13. His 28-inning scoreless streak is the fifth-longest in franchise history, trailing only a who’s-who of Dodgers luminaries: Orel Hershiser, Don Drysdale, Don Sutton and Sandy Koufax. Kershaw has the longest streak since Hershiser’s record 59-inning run in 1988.

“It’s tough,” Miller said of his pitching matchup. “Knowing what he’s capable of and doing what he’s doing, you know you’ve got to do the same thing. It’s just frustrating when you give up runs and give up those big innings. You give them a lot of momentum.”

Miller gave up seven hits and six runs in five innings, but at least his sore back wasn’t a problem.

With 12 wins in 16 games, Los Angeles (47-37) has pulled virtually even with the slumping Giants (46-36) atop the NL West. The Dodgers were 9 1/2 games behind San Francisco on June 8, but erased the entire deficit in three weeks.

“When we were struggling early, I think everyone knew in the back of their minds that we could turn it around,” Kershaw said. “Coming back and tying up the Giants in a month is not something we expected, just like we didn’t expect to go 42-8 last year, but we have that ability.”

Kershaw’s bid for back-to-back home no-hitters lasted exactly two pitches before Carpenter lined a single to left. Although he walked two and retired the side in order just once, Kershaw never allowed a runner to reach third base while getting at least one strikeout in each inning.

Kershaw still finished strong by striking pinch-hitter Jon Jay and Carpenter to end the seventh, earning a loud standing ovation from the Dodger Stadium crowd.

“He’s been the best pitcher in the world (lately),” said Matt Kemp, who drove in the Dodgers’ first run. “You get a day off from your legs sometimes when he’s pitching, because you don’t have to run too much (in the field).”

Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher C.J. Wilson throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Sunday, June 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher C.J. Wilson throws during the first inning of a baseball game against the Kansas City Royals, Sunday, June 29, 2014, in Kansas City, Mo. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Los Angeles Angels lost a game after a costly error, but an injury to Albert Pujols could hurt them even more.

Omar Infante delivered another big hit against the Angels, singling home the winning run with one out in the ninth inning that lifted the Kansas City Royals to a 5-4 victory Sunday.

Pujols pulled up lame in the sixth inning when he jogged into second base when he tried to stretch a single into a double and was thrown out by left fielder Alex Gordon

“He felt a little something in his groin,” Angels manager Mike Scioscia said. “We’ll see how his situation is after the doctor looks at him. It had nothing to do with hustle.”

Pujols said he initially felt something in his left thigh Wednesday, but does not believe he should miss any time.

“It’s fine,” the slugger said. “I knew it was going to be a close play. When he threw it offline, I shut it down and started to feel it. My mindset was to kind of shut it down. That’s not an excuse. I have to run to the bag. They made a good play.”

“It’s a gland and it grabbed me a little. They’re not too concerned about it. I don’t feel it when I’m hitting. The first time I felt it was when I was running. It’s been a couple of days,” he said. “I took some swings and I didn’t want to come out. If I get on base, then they would pinch-run for me. It didn’t bother me to hit. I don’t want to come out when I have a chance and I’m DHing.”

Lorenzo Cain hit three doubles for the Royals, finishing with four hits and two RBIs.

An error by second baseman Howie Kendrick set up the game-ending hit by Infante, whose grand slam Friday night helped beat the Angels.

Infante’s single came against Los Angeles newcomer Jason Grilli (0-3). Pittsburgh traded its former closer to the Angels on Friday.

Greg Holland (1-2) struck out two in the ninth.

Gordon was hit by a pitch with one out in the Kansas City ninth. Salvador Perez followed with a grounder to shortstop Erick Aybar, but his throw glanced off Kendrick’s error and sent Gordon to third. Infante followed with his single.

“I peeked too soon,” Kendrick said. “It was a good feed. It just came off my glove. It happens sometimes. I feel bad because the pitcher did his job.”

“I’ve dropped balls before, but I don’t remember dropping one like that. I came out of it too soon. I took my head out of the play. I had time. Perez is not a fast baserunner. I had time and the throw was right there. I looked too soon and didn’t follow the ball into the glove. It opened the game up for them.”

Kole Calhoun led off the game with a home run against Jeremy Guthrie. The Angels added another run in the first on Cain’s error in right field, and Los Angeles took a 3-0 lead into the fourth.

Aybar homered later in the inning to make it 4-all.

After the Angels loaded the bases with two outs in the seventh, Kelvin Herrera was summoned to face Pujols and retired him on a fly ball.

The Royals won challenges in the third and fifth inning and both resulted in double plays being converted. It was the first time the Royals won two challenges in a game.

Cain’s two-run double highlighted a four-run fourth off C.J. Wilson.

“He was so good for us for so long early,” Scioscia said. “He’s simply not commanding counts. He’s pitching way behind. CJ has the knack to be able to make that one pitch and get out of situations, but not when you are always pitching behind. CJ has really good stuff, but he can’t use it all when he’s way behind in counts.”

Wilson faced 22 batters and 12 reached base seven hits, four walks and a hit batter in 3 2/3 innings. Angels starting pitchers combined for only 11 2/3 innings in the three-game series to create a work overload for the bullpen.

“I couldn’t get outs from some of the guys I would get outs from,” Wilson said. “It seems like Cain was on base in scoring position all day and when he came up with guys on base he fouled balls off and fouled balls off. I’d get ahead of him and he’d foul and foul and foul. It was just his day in that matchup.”

(Kansas City) (AP) – The Kansas City Royals signed first-round draft pick Brandon Finnegan, a left-handed pitcher who helped lead TCU to the College World Series, on Saturday.

Finnegan signed for $2,200,600, the slotted money for the 17th overall pick. With Finnegan agreeing to terms, the Royals have signed all 12 of their picks in the first 10 rounds.

Finnegan, who went 9-3 with a 2.04 ERA while striking out 134 in 105 2-3 innings as a junior, will report Monday to the Royals’ High-A Wilmington (Del.) affiliate.

He pitched for Team USA last summer and beat Cuba 1-0, allowing three hits, striking out seven and walking one in seven innings.

Finnegan was a 2011 45th round pick of the Texas Rangers out of Fort Worth Southwest High, but did not sign, opting to go to TCU.

(Kansas City) (AP) – Wade Davis was trying to make the perfect pitch and hit a batter instead.

It wound up costing the Kansas City Royals the game.

“That’s a tough way to go down right there,” he said, shortly after hitting A.J. Ellis of the Los Angeles Dodgers with the bases loaded and two outs in the eighth inning Wednesday night. “I just tried to make a perfect pitch. It just ran away from him a little bit and came up and hit him.”

The run unknotted a tie game and gave Los Angeles a 5-4 victory.

Jamey Wright (3-2) threw 2 2-3 scoreless innings in relief of Dan Haren, and J.P. Howell and Brandon League worked the bottom of the eighth for the Dodgers. Brian Wilson handled the ninth in place of closer Kenley Jansen for his first save since April 12, 2012.

It wasn’t easy, though. Danny Valencia hit a one-out single and pinch-runner Pedro Ciriaco stole second – he was initially called out but the call was overturned by replay. But Wilson got Lorenzo Cain to line out to first base, and Ciriaco was doubled off second to end the game.

“They all sting a little, some a little bit worse than others, but they all sting,” Royals manager Ned Yost said. “We had more than one chance in the ninth inning to pick up some runs, but we just didn’t capitalize on it.”

Davis (5-2) had not allowed a run in 22 1-3 innings spanning his last 20 outings. But after nearly escaping a jam by catching Adrian Gonzalez in a rundown between third base and home for the second out of the eighth, the reliever walked Scott Van Slyke to load the bases.

Davis then had a 1-2 count on Ellis before hitting him in the shoulder.

“Wade is solid all day, every day,” Royals starter James Shields said. “We’re all human, man. It’s going to be tough not to give up runs all year long.”

Matt Kemp homered and Gonzalez and Yasiel Puig drove in a run apiece for the Dodgers, while Dee Gordon had four hits and his league-leading 40th stolen base.

Cain and Jarrod Dyson hit solo shots for the Royals.

Haren gave up two homers among six hits, walked two and was pulled after throwing 92 pitches in 4 1-3 innings. The three-time All-Star had gone at least five innings while allowing four earned runs or fewer in his previous 15 starts with the Dodgers, the longest streak by any pitcher to begin his career with the club in the last 100 years.

Shields wasn’t much better, though he lasted a whole lot longer. After breezing through the first, the Royals’ ace allowed four runs, seven hits and a walk in seven innings.

Shields gave away the 1-0 lead that Cain supplied with his leadoff homer when Kemp went deep in the second. Shields then allowed two more runs in the third on consecutive triples by Gordon and Puig – Gordon scored on a balk by Shields – and a groundout by Gonzalez.

The Royals got one back in the fourth on Mike Moustakas’s RBI single, but Los Angeles restored its cushion in the fifth when Gordon singled, swiped second and scored on Puig’s double.

Kansas City finally squared things in the bottom half. Dyson led off with a homer, his first in 277 at-bats, and Billy Butler’s groundout was enough to score Cain from third.

But when the game came down to a battle of bullpens, the Dodgers’ proved to be better.

“The story is more about the bullpen and the guys scratching out the last run,” Haren said. “Today they played great behind me.”

LONDON (AP) — Uncle Toni’s reaction said it all.

This one meant a lot to him and to the tennis player he coaches, his No. 1-ranked nephew Rafael Nadal, who was in a tough spot Thursday, one point from trailing two sets to none against the same guy he lost to — in the same stadium, same round — two years ago at Wimbledon.

As the younger Nadal began turning things around, evening the match at a set apiece on his opponent’s double-fault, the older Nadal dispensed with any sense of decorum, leaping out his Centre Court seat, punching the air, and shouting “Vamos!”

From there, the ultimate result quickly became apparent. Nadal came back to beat 52nd-ranked Lukas Rosol of the Czech Republic 4-6, 7-6 (6), 6-4, 6-4, returning to the third round at the All England Club for the first time since 2011.

“I didn’t want to lose another time against a guy like this,” Toni Nadal said. “I don’t like to lose against a player I find (unprofessional).”

In 2012′s second round, Rosol was ranked 100th, and Nadal was on a streak of having reached the final in five consecutive Wimbledon appearances. The big-swinging, 6-foot-5 (1.96-meter) Rosol played an unrepentantly risky style that day, aiming for lines and putting shots where he wanted, pulling off a five-set victory.

Rosol engaged in some gamesmanship then, including moving around while waiting to receive serves and, Toni said Thursday, making noise as Rafael was hitting shots. After the rematch, Rosol complained Nadal took too much time between points and lamented that the chair umpire didn’t intervene.

Said Toni about Rosol: “It’s normal that we want to win, but it’s true that for me, it’s worse to lose with him than with another guy.”

Rafael, for his part, said he wasn’t thinking about two years ago. Still, for nearly two full sets, it was hard not to recall that match because Rosol played similarly, hitting hard, flat strokes that didn’t miss. When Rosol broke for a 3-2 lead in the second set with a cross-court backhand, he had a 24-9 edge in winners.

Nadal broke back to 4-all, whirling around and throwing a celebratory uppercut, but again was in trouble at 6-5 in the tiebreaker. On that set point, Nadal whipped a winner he called “a perfect forehand for that moment” to get to 6-all. Two points later, Rosol plopped a second serve into the net for a double-fault that ceded the set, and said later: “In the end, he was more lucky.”

Nadal probably would not agree with that assessment. He did agree about the significance of that sequence.

“The difference maybe is one point,” said Nadal, who collected two of his 14 Grand Slam titles at Wimbledon but exited in the first round last year. “Maybe if I lose that set point in the second set — if that forehand down the line went out — maybe (I) will be here with a loss.”

Instead, he raised the level of his play. He won 22 consecutive points on his serve, and moved better, bending so low his knee touched the grass on backhands. Nadal broke for a 2-1 lead in the third set, and again for a 1-0 lead in the fourth.

“If I had played the first set the way I did the last two, I would have won it, too, I think,” Nadal said.

Three seeded men lost, including No. 13 Richard Gasquet, who wasted nine match points and was beaten by 19-year-old Nick Kyrgios of Australia 3-6, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 7-5, 10-8. Winners included No. 5 Stan Wawrinka, No. 8 Milos Raonic, No. 9 John Isner and No. 10 Kei Nishikori among the men, and past champions Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova among the women.

Nadal’s longtime rival, seven-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer, turned in a far more straightforward performance, delivering 25 aces in a 6-3, 7-5, 6-3 win over 103rd-ranked Gilles Muller of Luxembourg to get back to the third round, too.

Federer’s streak of 36 consecutive major quarterfinals ended at the All England Club with a second-round defeat last year, part of a tumultuous and unpredictable tournament. This year has gone more to form, so far.

“For the most part, the locker room I’m in, it still seems pretty full — where all the seeded players are,” Isner said. “It’s good to see. It’s good for the tournament to have all the big names, especially the top four, still alive.”