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(Cherokee Village)- The Cherokee Village 60th Anniversary Celebration Planning Committee will be meeting on Thursday, August 28, from 8-9:30AM.

The meeting is open to anyone interested in supporting celebration planning. During the meeting you will hear the latest plans, brainstorm some activities.

The Planning Meetings are held at the Cherokee Village United Methodist Church

Fellowship Hall, located at 21 Otter Drive Cherokee Village, AR 72529.

For more information you can call 870-257-3869.

(Melbourne)- Ozarka College is currently accepting trainer cars in the Automotive Service Technology (AST) program, to enable students to gain hands-on experience.

2005 model or newer will provide students with the best experience and are preferred, but other donations will certainly be considered. Students will take apart, repair, and put back together the trainer cars multiple times throughout their education.

Though the AST program currently provides students with vehicles to practice, newer year models are needed for updated training.  Ozarka College strives to prepare graduates of the AST program for highly successful careers, and the newer automobiles will strengthen students’ skills.

For more information about Ozarka College’s Automotive Service Technology program or to donate a trainer car, please contact Chris Layne, Ozarka College Automotive Instructor, at 870-368-2087.

(West Plains) – Allstate agency owner Jason Peterson recently received the Agency Hands in the Community Award for his commitment to helping others, and a local agency received a $1000 grant.

The $1000 grant from The Allstate Foundation went to the The Boys & Girls Club of the Greater West Plains Area, where Peterson volunteers.

The Allstate Foundation awards more than $1 million every year to nonprofit organizations across the country in honor of dedicated Allstate agency owners who give back. To be eligible for nomination, Allstate agency owners must mentor, lead, or volunteer with a nonprofit of their choice.

(Mammoth Spring) – The Common Sense Property Rights Coalition will meet Monday, September 1, at 6 PM at Fred’s Fish House in Mammoth Spring.

The primary speaker of the evening will be Eric King, Oregon County Director of Emergency Management. King is also Chief Deputy of the Oregon County Sheriff’s Department, and will update members on emergency management plans during disasters, according to Co-Chair of the PRC, Kevin Jotz.

All area residents interested in private property rights, food freedom and protection of constitutional rights are invited to attend. For more information call 417-264-2435 or 417-270-1724.

FILE - In this April 20, 2014 file photo, Alice Uden listens to the judge during jury selection at the Laramie County District Court in Cheyenne, Wyo. A judge sentenced Uden to life in prison on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, for killing her husband with a rifle in the mid-1970s and throwing his body down the shaft of an abandoned gold mine, where it remained for nearly 40 years.(AP Photo/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle, Miranda Grubbs, File)

FILE – In this April 20, 2014 file photo, Alice Uden listens to the judge during jury selection at the Laramie County District Court in Cheyenne, Wyo. A judge sentenced Uden to life in prison on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014, for killing her husband with a rifle in the mid-1970s and throwing his body down the shaft of an abandoned gold mine, where it remained for nearly 40 years.(AP Photo/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle, Miranda Grubbs, File)

(Cheyenne) (AP) – The daughter of a Missouri woman sentenced for killing her husband in Wyoming almost 40 years ago said Wednesday she stands by her mother as she prepares to spend the rest of her life in a remote prison.

The daughter of the victim was not so kind.

“I believe you are a very disturbed individual yourself,” Sharon Brock wrote about defendant Alice Uden in a letter to the court before the sentencing on Monday. “You do not deserve to be alive in my eyes.”

Brock said Uden prevented her from ever meeting her father and until recently knowing what became of him.

Soon after the letter was read in a Cheyenne courtroom, a judge gave Uden life in prison, the maximum sentence for her second-degree murder conviction.

Uden, 75, of Chadwick, Missouri, will do her time at the Wyoming Women’s Center in Lusk, population, 1,600, located in the least-populous county in the nation’s most sparsely populated state.

In May, a jury rejected Uden’s claim that she shot Ronald Holtz, then 25, with a rifle to protect her daughter, Erica Prunty, after Holtz became enraged by the crying of the 2-year-old. They found her guilty after prosecutors said she shot Holtz while he slept.

Uden’s attorneys drew from Holtz’s psychiatric records and described him as psychologically unstable and abusive toward Uden and her daughter. The now-42-year-old Erica Hayes of St. Louis maintains that Uden saved her by shooting Holtz in her mother’s trailer home in late 1974 or early 1975.

Police at the time were little help to her abused mother, Hayes said in a statement emailed Wednesday to The Associated Press.

“She was ready and willing to protect her baby at any cost,” Hayes wrote. “She is being punished for a crime she never should have been forced to commit.”

Prosecutors said Uden put the body of Holtz in a cardboard barrel and dumped it in an abandoned mine shaft on a southeast Wyoming ranch.

“JUSTICE has been and will be done. Know you are not forgiven for your sins,” Brock wrote in her letter to the court.

Hayes’ half-brother, Todd Scott, testified at his mother’s trial that she once told him she had shot Holtz in his sleep and disposed of his body in the mine. Scott said he resented what his mother did and how she burdened him with knowledge of the crime.

“I hope it was all worth it,” Scott muttered to his mother as he left the courtroom.

Investigators made previous unsuccessful attempts to find Holtz’s body in the mine filled with the carcasses of cattle and other ranch animals. They finally succeeded last summer after digging deeper than ever before. They found a bullet in his skull.

Holtz was Uden’s third husband. Last fall, investigators arrested Uden and her fourth and current husband, Gerald Uden, 72, in Missouri and charged them in two separate murder cases.

Prosecutors have not linked the two attacks.

Gerald Uden is serving life in prison after pleading guilty to three counts of first-degree murder in the shooting of his ex-wife and her two sons, ages 11 and 10. Their bodies have not been recovered.

FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2014 photo people donate money for the family of Michael Brown during a rally in Ferguson, Mo. Fundraising on behalf of the family of the black 18-year-old shot Aug. 9 by white police officer Darren Wilson, has drawn more than $280,000 in contributions from online fundraising,  concerts, memorial T-shirt sales and other efforts. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

FILE – In this Aug. 9, 2014 photo people donate money for the family of Michael Brown during a rally in Ferguson, Mo. Fundraising on behalf of the family of the black 18-year-old shot Aug. 9 by white police officer Darren Wilson, has drawn more than $280,000 in contributions from online fundraising, concerts, memorial T-shirt sales and other efforts. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

(St. Louis) (AP) – Donors have given nearly $700,000 to online fundraising sites set up to collect money for the family of a black 18-year-old and the white police officer who fatally shot him in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson.

The Michael Brown Memorial Fund has raised almost $280,000 from more than 9,300 people in 13 days. Two sites supporting police officer Darren Wilson have taken in nearly $410,000 from nearly 10,000 contributors. The donations have come through the site GoFundMe.com.

A look at some key points behind the fundraising efforts:

BROWN FAMILY: The money collected for the Brown family is meant to defray funeral, burial, travel and living expenses “as they seek justice on Michael’s behalf.” None of the donations will go toward the family’s legal fees, the web page says.

WILSON’S SUPPORTERS: Public rallies in support of Wilson have been far smaller than the street demonstrations to protest Brown’s death. But the contributions on the officer’s behalf have eclipsed the online donations to the Browns. An early GoFundMe.com page raised $234,900 within eight days and was replaced by another page that has collected more than $175,000. The combined total is from nearly 9,900 donors. According to the page, that money is to be spent on “potential legal fees, relocation and living expenses” of Wilson and his immediate family.

FLOOD OF DONATIONS: Since Brown’s death, people from New York to California have given money to one side or the other. The online fundraising is in addition to other events benefiting either side, including benefit concerts and T-shirt sales.

WHO’S GIVING? GoFundMe.com allows donors to identify themselves. Many contributors to the Browns willingly give their name. Wilson’s backers have largely preferred to stay secret. Much like the rallies on Wilson’s behalf that have attracted sign-carriers who refused to identify themselves, contributors to Wilson’s funds are virtually all anonymous. Many of his supporters have said revealing their names could put them at risk of retaliation. In the early days of the unrest after Brown’s shooting, black protesters used the refrain “I am Michael Brown.” Not long after that, the phrase was co-opted by Wilson supporters, who began identifying themselves as “I am Darren Wilson.”

THE BACKDROP: With separate criminal and civil-rights investigations underway, the facts of the confrontation that led to the shooting remain murky. Police have said the 28-year-old Wilson, a six-year police veteran, was pushed into his patrol vehicle and physically assaulted during a struggle with Brown over the officer’s gun. Some witnesses have reported seeing Brown’s arms up in the air – an apparent sign of surrender – before the shooting. Wilson, who has not been charged, has been in hiding since the shooting.

A local grand jury is reviewing the shooting, and the Justice Department is conducting its own investigation. Wilson has not been charged with any wrongdoing.

(Joplin) (AP) – A 24-year-old southwest Missouri woman has been arrested on an accusation that she posed with the body of a dead man and posted them on her Facebook page.

The Joplin Globe reports the Carl Junction woman is accused of posing with the body of 30-year-old Dennis Meyer, a Joplin man who was found dead last week in a rural Newton County driveway.

Newton County Sheriff Ken Copeland says he plans to submit a charge of abandonment of a corpse to the county prosecutor’s office. He says authorities are still searching for a male suspect who also is pictured in the photos.

Copeland has said Meyer possibly died of a drug overdose. An autopsy has been performed, but authorities are waiting for a toxicology report.

(Ferguson) (AP) – U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt is asking the Justice Department to help reimburse state and St. Louis-area law enforcement agencies for costs incurred while providing security in Ferguson this month.

Blunt said in a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder on Wednesday that many of the police agencies do not have the resources to respond to the level of unrest that occurred in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer on Aug. 9. Blunt, a Republican, says the unanticipated cost may force many agencies to seek out additional resources.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that St. Louis County Executive Charlie Dooley estimates that each night of policing in Ferguson cost the county police department alone up to $100,000.

(Lebanon) (AP) – The Humane Society of Missouri is taking 126 dogs and cats from the Lebanon Humane Society in southern Missouri, at the request of that facility’s newly elected board of directors.

Lebanon Humane Society board president Judith Koch says the new board was shocked at overcrowding and appalled by filthy conditions at the shelter. Plans are in place to bring the facility into compliance and restructure the organization, but Koch says the best alternative for existing animals is to have the state Humane Society care for them and put them up for adoption.

The animals include 65 cats, 49 medium-to-large dogs and 12 small-breed dogs.

The Humane Society of Missouri says all of the animals will be spayed and neutered. Some could be available for adoption as early as next week.

(Ferguson) (AP) – Law professors at Saint Louis University are asking the Ferguson mayor to grant clemency to thousands of nonviolent offenders, in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown.

KSDK-TV reports that professors and the non-profit Arch City Defenders on Tuesday asked Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III to drop efforts to collect overdue fines for traffic tickets. The group says Ferguson has more than 40,000 outstanding warrants for nonviolent offenders.

Professor Brendan Roediger says many offenders can’t afford to pay fines, leading to warrants and a cycle of mounting debts.

Messages seeking comment from the city were not immediately returned.