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(Mountain Home) – The Donald W. Reynolds Library invites everyone to join them for their Issues & Viewpoints monthly book discussion at on Wednesday, September 3, at 1:30PM.

This month’s discussion will be on the book “Tower of Basel” by Adam LeBor, the inside story of the Bank for International Settlements, the world’s most secretive global financial institution. Newcomers to the discussion group are encouraged to attend. The Issues & Viewpoints book discussion group meets on the first Wednesday of each month except in December.

For additional information, call 870-580-0987 ext. 2975 or visit www.baxlib.org.

(Ferguson) (AP) – Police in the St. Louis suburb where a white officer shot and killed an unarmed 18-year-old have started wearing body cameras.

The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Ferguson police began wearing the cameras Saturday. Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson told the newspaper officers had the devices on during a protest march Saturday. The march marked the Aug. 9 shooting death of Michael Brown by Ferguson officer Darren Wilson.

Jackson said the department was given about 50 body cameras by two companies about a week ago. Company representatives offered training to officers Saturday on using the devices that attach to their uniforms and record video and audio. Jackson said each officer will get one to use.

(AP)

(AP)

(NBC) – Alleged nude photos of Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence and a large number of other female celebrities are in the hands of a self-proclaimed hacker who has photos from ’100s of A-list celebrities’.

The alleged photos were reportedly stolen after a massive hacking campaign targeting Apple’s iCloud storage service. Apple has yet to comment on the matter.

While many celebrities and their spokespeople are coming out as saying that the photos are fake, Lawrence’s reps confirmed the photos on Sunday. “This is a flagrant violation of privacy,” Lawrence’s spokesperson said in a statement. “The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos [of Lawrence].”

Other images reportedly stolen in the hack include model Kate Upton, actresses Kirsten Dunst and Scarlett Johansson and soccer player Hope Solo.

(NBC contributed to this report)

Family members of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old who was fatally shot by a white police officer three weeks earlier, have a moment of silence at the site of the shooting in Ferguson, Mo. on Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014. Fifth from left is his father, Michael Brown Sr., with towel, and mother, Lesley McSpadden, third from right. (AP Photo/Bill Boyce)

Family members of Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old who was fatally shot by a white police officer three weeks earlier, have a moment of silence at the site of the shooting in Ferguson, Mo. on Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014. Fifth from left is his father, Michael Brown Sr., with towel, and mother, Lesley McSpadden, third from right. (AP Photo/Bill Boyce)

(Ferguson) (AP) – Hundreds converged on Ferguson on Saturday to march for Michael Brown, the unarmed black 18-year-old who was shot and killed by a white police officer three weeks ago to the day. His death stoked national discourse about police tactics and race, which the rally’s organizers pledged to continue.

Led by Brown’s parents and other relatives, Saturday’s throng peacefully made their way down Canfield Drive in the St. Louis suburb to a makeshift memorial that marked the spot where Brown was shot Aug. 9 by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson.

“We know that his life is not going to be in vain,” the Rev. Spencer Booker of St. Louis’ St. Paul A.M.E. Church said into a megaphone, standing in the middle of the street amid candles, placards, stuffed animals and now-wilted flowers. “We know you’re going to even the score, God. We know you’re going to make the wrong right.”

Brown’s parents – mother Lesley McSpadden and father Michael Brown Sr. – encircled the memorial with other family members during prayers, including one by a Muslim clergy member.

Hours later, hundreds of protesters again gathered in front of the suburban police department and fire station, blocking the road. Fiery speeches by way of speakers mounted to a car gave way to another march, with chants of, “If we can’t have it, we’re shutting it down.”

Some lobbed angry insults at a line of Ferguson officers and state police who stood guard at a taped-off section of the city parking lot, but the numbers of protesters dwindled to double digits by late afternoon.

Wilson, a six-year police veteran, has not been charged. A St. Louis County grand jury is considering evidence in the case, and federal investigators are sorting out whether Brown’s civil rights were violated.

There was a muted police presence Saturday during the march, which began on a West Florissant Avenue stretch that became the nexus of nightly protests – some contentious and violent – and looting in the days after Brown’s death. Many of the businesses’ windows remain boarded up, though most have reopened. Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, whom Missouri’s governor put in charge of security in Ferguson, was there, at times posing with rally attendees for selfies.

Saturday morning’s gathering included tailgaters and people hawking T-shirts memorializing Brown or featuring slogan, “Hands up, Don’t Shoot” – a phrase that reflects what witnesses have said Brown did in surrender before being shot. Police have said the shooting happened after a struggle between Brown and Wilson in Wilson’s patrol vehicle, though authorities have said little else, citing the investigations.

“We’re just three weeks into this, and this is only the beginning of this movement,” said Jerryl Christmas, a St. Louis attorney who helped lead Saturday’s march and others in the past. He’s intent on keeping Brown and the resulting turmoil and questions “in the forefront of America.”

“We want the president to come here. He remarked that he didn’t have a strategy for ISIS and Syria, but we need a strategy for urban America,” Christmas said. “The tragedy is this could have happened anywhere.”

(Little Rock) (AP) – Democrats Mark Pryor and Mike Ross took different positions on the president’s federal health overhaul plan when it came before Congress four years ago. But, running in the two hottest races in Arkansas this fall, both find themselves under attack on the issue and navigating around it as they struggle to prevent a complete Republican takeover of the state’s top offices.

Pryor, running for re-election to the Senate, and Ross, a former congressman running for governor, are facing Republican opponents touting an “Obamacare” message. Both Democrats are trying to embrace part of a law that is generally unpopular in Arkansas but that is helping thousands in the state gain coverage.

Experts say the challenge for the two will be focusing on the law’s specifics and not just its unpopular label.

(Sikeston) – MoDOT has released their work schedule for next week, weather permitting.

HOWELL COUNTY

  • Route 101, from Highway 160 in Howell County to the Arkansas State line in Ozark County, will be reduced as contractor crews perform pavement overlay starting Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Friday, Sept. 19 from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., including weekends as necessary.
  • Route U in Howell County, from Highway 60 to Route N, will be reduced to one lane as crews perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
  • Route RA in Howell County, from Highway 60 to the end of state maintenance, will be reduced to one lane as crews continue to perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
  • Route UU in Howell County, from Highway 63 to the end of state maintenance, will be reduced to one lane as crews perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
  • Route DD in Howell County, from Route 137 to the end of state maintenance, will be reduced to one lane as crews perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

SHANNON COUNTY

  • Route 19 in Shannon County, from Route 106 to Missouri Avenue in Eminence, will be reduced to one lane as crews perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
  • Route 99 in Shannon County, near the intersection of Highway 60 in Birch Tree, will be reduced to one lane as crews perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

DOUGLAS COUNTY

  • Route AM, from Route 181 in Douglas County to US 60 in Howell County, will be reduced to one lane as crews perform pavement repairs Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

TEXAS COUNTY

  • Route 17 in Texas County, from Route 106 to south Route W, will be reduced to one lane as crews partially overlay the roadway Tuesday, Sept. 2 through Thursday, Sept. 4 from 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. daily.

Other projects slated to start later in the month include:

  • Highway 160 in Howell County, from Route 101 to Route JJ, will be reduced to one lane as contractor crews seal the roadway with a mixture of rock and oil starting Monday, Sept. 8 through Friday, Sept. 19 from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., including weekends as necessary.
  • Route 17, from Route 106 in Texas County to US 60 in Howell County, will be reduced as contractor crews seal the roadway with a mixture of rock and oil starting Monday, Sept. 8 through Friday, Sept. 19 from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m., including weekends as necessary.

MoDOT officials say all work zones will be marked with signs, and motorists are asked to be extremely cautious if traveling near the area.

Smart phones and instant messaging were not even imagines in the early 1900s. At that time, information sometimes traveled on trains. Trains went from town to town to pick up fruit produced in southern Missouri to ship out to the big cities. The photo above is the horticulture train car with displays and information based on fruit research conducted at the State Fruit Experiment Station delivered to growers in rural towns.

Smart phones and instant messaging were not even imagines in the early 1900s. At that time, information sometimes traveled on trains. Trains went from town to town to pick up fruit produced in southern Missouri to ship out to the big cities. The photo above is the horticulture train car with displays and information based on fruit research conducted at the State Fruit Experiment Station delivered to growers in rural towns.

by Marilyn Odneal, Horticulture Adviser

(Mountain Grove) – The State Fruit Experiment Station was established in 1899 by an act of the Missouri legislature to serve the fruit production and processing industries of Missouri. In the early 1900s south central Missouri was a large fruit growing area and the roads to the land grant university in centrally located Columbia were not very good. There was little communication between the two areas so the experiment station was independently established and located at Mountain Grove. Information from research at the experiment station was printed in bulletins that were distributed via a horticulture car on the trains that picked fruit up from the towns in southern Missouri and shipped it to the big cities.

The station became part of Missouri State University in 1974. Dr. Anson Elliott presently serves as the eighth director of the State Fruit Experiment. The first director of the State Fruit Experiment Station, J. T. Stinson, popularized the Old English saying “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” at the 1904 World Fair in St. Louis.

Former director Paul Shepard aided the rebirth of the wine industry after Prohibition with a project funded by the Sears-Roebuck Foundation in the late 40s-early 50s. This project involved 100 acres of grapes, primarily Catawba, planted in five acre plots on farms in the Ozarks. The juice from these grapes was pressed at the State Fruit Experiment Station and transported on train cars to wineries in St. Louis, California, New York and Ohio. This project was instrumental in increasing grape production in the Ozarks after the Volstead Act was repealed in 1933.

“There’s a good day coming when vineyards will garland the Ozark hills and wine flowing from the presses will bring wealth to the growers. This is the conviction of Paul H. Shepard, director of the State Fruit Experiment Station here. It is based on the experiments carried on under his direction during the 17 years that he has been here and those made before he came, over a total period of 40 years. Land is cheap and adaptable, labor costs are low, markets are accessible, and on the score of dependability there has been but one crop failure at the station in 22 years. So grapes are the answer to the Ozark farmer’s prayer.” (St. Louis Post-Dispatch July 23, 1951).

Several commercially important fruit cultivars were released from the State Fruit Experiment Station breeding program through the years including Ozark Gold apple, Loring peach, and Ozark Premier and Bluefre plum. The traditional breeding program at the Experiment Station was discontinued in 1985 but the new research continues the work in improving grapevines. Traditional crosses are made between cultivars – primarily disease resistant and winter cold hardy Norton grape crossed with disease susceptible, winter tender, high-quality Vitis vinifera cultivars such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Pinot Noir. The hybrid seed is collected and hybrid identity is verified through biotechnology. Identification of the genes involved in particular traits is also done.

Today the State Fruit Experiment Station is part of the new William H. Darr School of Agriculture at Missouri State which includes the Department of Agriculture, the Darr Agricultural Center and Shealy Farm in Springfield; and the Missouri State Winery and Distillery, the Center for Grapevine Biotechnology and the Journagan Ranch in Mountain Grove.

I am sure that the horticulture train car in the early 1900s was thought to be an information superhighway back in the day. If they only knew what the future would hold. Lately, however, things seem to be moving too fast for me to keep up with. What is a HASHTAG anyway!

For more information, comments or questions concerning this column, contact Marilyn Odneal via email at MarilynOdneal@missouristate.edu; write to Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station, 9740 Red Spring Road, Mountain Grove, Mo. 65711; or call (417) 547-7500. Visit our website at http://mtngrv.missouristate.edu.

(Springfield) – Many people will be taking road trips, spending time at Missouri’s lakes and rivers and having cook outs this weekend. The American Red Cross offers safety tips to help everyone have a safe and enjoyable time.

“We encourage everyone to take a few simple, safety steps when spending time on the road, at the beach and at cook outs,” said Chris Harmon, Regional Disaster Program Officer, Springfield. “Start by downloading our free First Aid and Swim apps.”

People should also follow these safety tips:

Tips for Safe Travel

  • Take emergency supplies such as food and water, a flashlight and a first aid kit.
  • Let someone know your destination, your route and when you expect to arrive.
  • Buckle up and obey traffic signs.
  • Avoid texting and talking on the phone while driving.
  • Don’t drink and drive.

Tips for Safe Swimming

  • Check weather and beach conditions throughout the day.
  • Always swim in an area supervised by a lifeguard and obey all warnings.
  • Provide close and constant attention to children in or near the water.
  • Stay within arm’s reach of young children and inexperienced swimmers while they are in the water.
  • Young children, inexperienced swimmers and boaters should wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets.

Tips for Safe Grilling

  • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Keep children and pets away from the grill.
  • Never add charcoal starter fluid after coals have been ignited.
  • Use long-handled utensils.
  • Don’t leave the grill unattended while in use.

The Red Cross has a series of mobile apps in case people run into severe weather or need expert advice on what to do in case of an emergency. People can go to redcross.org/apps for information.

(Jonesboro) – Almost 900 candidates were awarded diplomas during Arkansas State University’s 2014 summer commencement ceremony, Aug. 8 in the Convocation Center.

Provost Dr. Lynita Cooksey defined the evening as “a time of excitement for families and friends” before conferring the degrees to students from 11 colleges.

Undergraduate and graduate-level students earned degrees from Arkansas State’s colleges of Agriculture and Technology, Business, Education and Behavioral Science, Engineering, Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Media and Communication, Nursing and Health Professions, Sciences and Mathematics, University College and the Honors College.

Forty-three candidates graduated with honors, including two summa cum laude/university honors, one summa cum laude and one magna cum laude/university honors, 11 magna cum laude, two cum laude/university honors and 26 cum laude.

Here is the 2014 summer graduating list by state or country, county, hometown, name, degree and major:

Arkansas

Baxter, Calico Rock, Stephanie Nicole Cannon, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Nursing

Baxter, Calico Rock, Ashton J Glenn, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Nursing

Baxter, Gassville, Roger G. Smith, Bachelor of Science, Business Administration

Baxter, Harriet, Brett M Harris, Bachelor of Science, Management, Cum Laude

Baxter, Mountain Home, Brock R. Barnhill, Bachelor of Science, Exercise Science, Magna Cum Laude

Baxter, Mountain Home, Mason William Campbell, Master of Science in Education, Business Technology

Baxter, Mountain Home, Jennifer Denise Fitzmaurice, Master of Science in Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Baxter, Mountain Home, Natalie Brooke Johnson, Bachelor of Science in Education, Early Childhood Education, Cum Laude

Baxter, Mountain Home, Dora Ann Norcross, Master of Science in Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Baxter, Mountain Home, Michelle L. Pope, Master of Science in Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Baxter, Mountain Home, Lorri Jean Strider, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Nursing

Baxter, Mountain Home, Meagan L Thitoff, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Nursing

Baxter, Mountain Home, Jennifer Marie Wells, Bachelor of Science, Journalism News Education

Baxter, Norfork, Christy N. Boozer, Bachelor of Science in Education, Mid Level Education

Fulton, Mammoth Spring, Leigha Kathern Presley, Bachelor of Science, Radio Television

Marion, Pyatt, Steven Ray Sherrod, Master of Science in Education, Special Education Instructional Specialist 4-12

Sharp, Cave City, Samantha Jo Carlton, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Nursing

Sharp, Cave City, Patricia D. Purvis, Master of Science, Mathematics

Sharp, Cave City, James Dustin Rose, Master of Science in Education, Educational Leadership

Sharp, Cherokee Village, Ashley A. Armstrong, Bachelor of Science, Interdisciplinary Studies

Sharp, Cherokee Village, Colbert Tibbes English, Master of Public Administration, Public Administration

Sharp, Cherokee Village, Richard A. Wulff, Bachelor of Science in Education, Physical Education

Sharp, Hardy, Vangchee Lee, Bachelor of Science, Finance

Sharp, Poughkeepsie, Ranotta J Moser, Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Nursing

Stone, Mountain View, Matthew T McClung, Bachelor of Science, Interdisciplinary Studies

Stone, Mountain View, Sharon R. Wilson, Master of Science in Education, Special Education Instructional Specialist P-4

Missouri

Doniphan, Emily J Proffitt, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, Agricultural Business

Doniphan, Nicholas Neal Spencer, Bachelor of Science, Interdisciplinary Studies

Hayti, Leah Denise Peoples, Master of Science in Education, Education Theory and Practice

Winona, Beadie Phillips Zeigler, Master of Science in Education, Educational Leadership

Celebrating Labor Day

For many Americans, Labor Day means the end of summer and a three-day weekend. Family and friends across the country gather for backyard barbeques. Retailers offer deep discounts, and the fall campaign season kicks into high gear. While this may be the Labor Day we have come to recognize, the official “workingmen’s holiday” has an interesting history dating back to the 1880s.

Although there is some debate as to who is the father of Labor Day, most historians trace the holiday’s beginning back to the parade of unions and a massive picnic that took place in New York City on Sept. 5, 1882. Earlier that year, a proposal was put forth at a Central Labor Union meeting that all workers should come together in September for a massive labor festival. That August, the Central Labor Union passed a resolution stating “that the 5th of September be proclaimed a general holiday for the workingmen in this city.”

Despite reportedly selling 20,000 tickets to the event, the parade got off to a slow and uncertain start. With just a few marchers and no band, onlookers began suggesting the parade’s Grand Marshall, William McCabe, abandon the idea. Not to be discouraged, McCabe and a small group of workers began marching even as the crowds jeered at them. Fortunately, they did not have to wait long before 200 marchers from the Jewelers Union of Newark Two joined in, and they even had a band.

By the time the parade reached its termination point at Reservoir Park that day, it is said that somewhere between 10,000 to 20,000 men and women had marched. The celebration continued until 9 p.m. that evening, with nearly 25,000 union members and their families enjoying picnics, speeches, dancing and fireworks. Calling it a true “day of the people,” newspapers declared the celebration a huge success.

From that day on, the idea of formally honoring our workforce spread quickly throughout the country. On June 28, 1894 the 53rd Congress passed a bill officially making Labor Day a legal holiday to take place each year on the first Monday in September.

In the spirit of Labor Days past, and as we look to the future, I encourage you to think about how far our workforce has come since that September day in 1882. Think about the technology that has made our jobs easier and safer. Think about the rights we enjoy and all the men and women who fought for those rights.

Work is an important part of lives. It is the means by which we provide for ourselves and our families. Our work can also be a source of validation and fulfillment, and it allows us to continue acquiring knowledge and learning new skills long after we have left the classroom. I would sincerely like to thank everyone for the work they have contributed, and I hope you had a very enjoyable Labor Day weekend.

As always, I appreciate it when groups from around Missouri and from our community back home come to visit me at the Capitol, however during interim I may be in district. If you would like to arrange a time to come and visit me in Jefferson City, or if you ever have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact my Capitol office at (573) 751-1882.