Contact Us 417-256-1025 or 888-485-9390
Ozark Area Network
Horse TraderOzark Regional News Talk RadioKUKU Oldies 100KKDY 102.5KSPQ Q94 Jack FM96.9 The Fox

Archive for April, 2013

cunningham2(Jefferson City) – 33rd District Senator Mike Cunningham recently discussed the 2014 Fiscal Year budget and other topics including the issues at the Department of Revenue and Senate Bill 252.

Cunningham says that passing a budget is the only constitutional requirement of the Missouri General Assembly:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

He continued, adding Missouri didn’t see the revenue shortfall it has the last five years:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Cunningham also says the Missouri Department of Revenue continues to see a zero balance for part of its upcoming budget:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

He says that Senate Bill 252 also deals with the Department of Revenue:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The Department of Revenue has been in hot water since it was recently revealed that the department had been making electronic copies of applicants’ personal documents, such as concealed carry permits. Republican lawmakers have raised concerns about the potential for people’s privacy rights to be violated.

L-A-D Board Secretary Kay Drey, St. Louis, read a letter of appreciation to Terry Cunningham during a barbeque held in honor of his retirement after 40 years of service to Pioneer Forest. (Photo courtesy of Salem News)

L-A-D Board Secretary Kay Drey, St. Louis, read a letter of appreciation to Terry Cunningham during a barbeque held in honor of his retirement after 40 years of service to Pioneer Forest. (Photo courtesy of Salem News)

(Salem) – On the eve of his retirement, Pioneer Forest Manager Terry Cunningham has been honored by the LAD Foundation for his 40 years of “exemplary service” to Pioneer Forest, headquartered in Salem. He received commemorative gifts and appreciative speeches during a recent barbeque.

Cunningham began working for Leo Drey’s Pioneer Forest in 1972 as district forester, then in 1979 as chief forester, and since 2007 has served as forest manager, the organization’s top position.

LAD, which now owns Pioneer Forest, also announced the promotions of Jason Green, of Salem, to forest manager and Brandon Kuhn, Licking, to chief forester. Green holds a master’s degree in forestry from the University of Missouri and has worked for Pioneer Forest since December 2007. Kuhn began work with Pioneer Forest in August 2009 and holds a bachelor’s degree in forestry, also from MU.

The 140,000-acre Pioneer Forest, Missouri’s largest private landholding, is recognized for its single-tree selection method of forest management. The long-term success of this method has been documented by 60 years of results. When Leo Drey, of St. Louis, purchased a large tract in Shannon County from National Distillers Products in 1952, he kept not only the company name, Pioneer Forest, but also its foresters, who practiced the single-tree selection method, training their replacement foresters before retiring. Cunningham worked with the original foresters to learn the Pioneer technique and now has passed on that knowledge to continue the tradition.

Cunningham will officially retire as of July 1.

Jacob James

Jacob James

(Ava) – An Ava man faces sexual charges after an investigation by the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office.

31-year-old Jacob James was arrested Friday morning and charged with Forcible Rape, Forcible Sodomy, Armed Criminal Action, 1st Degree Domestic Assault, Felonious Restraint, and Tampering with a Victim in a Felony Prosecution.

Douglas County Sheriff Chris Degase says in a press release that he and other deputies responded to a rural residence approximately 10 miles east of Ava after receiving a well-being check request on an 18-year-old female that had been at the residence with James since April 19.

After being interviewed briefly on April 20, the female sought medical attention for her injuries. Officers spent the next several days compiling evidence and information regarding the alleged forcible rape and assault.

Bond was set at $500,000 cash by Associate Circuit Judge Elizabeth Bock.

Sheriff Degase added that the investigation was lengthy, with almost every deputy in the department working on the case in some fashion.

from Senator Mike Cunningham

On Monday, April 22, the Missouri Senate approved its version of the state’s operating budget for FY 2014, which will begin July 1 and go to June 30, 2014. The $24.7 billion operating budget is comprised of 13 core budget bills (HBs 1-13). Senator Mike Cunningham, R-Rogersville, is pleased to note that HB 9, which addresses funding for Department of Corrections (DOC), was passed out of the Senate to include an additional $150 salary increase for certain correction officers over the House’s recommendation. The pay raise, beginning July 1, would be implemented throughout the year and is set to continue beyond FY 2014.

“I’m very appreciative of all the efforts demonstrated by our state’s corrections officers who work tirelessly to ensure our state remains a safe place to live, work, and raise a family,” Sen. Cunningham said.

The proposed pay raise specifically applies to officers titled “Corrections Officers I” and “Corrections Officers II.” The Corrections Officer I position entails, among other duties, maintaining security in buildings, towers, and other posts of an adult correctional facility and intervening during emergencies. Missourians who work under the Corrections Officer II category, among other responsibilities, patrol the living quarters, grounds, and buildings of corrections facilities to observe offender behaviors and the effectiveness of corrections officers and/or probation and parole assistants.

The Senate version of the FY 2014 will be sent to the House (the chamber in which the bills originated) for its consideration. If the House does not agree with the Senate’s changes, a conference committee will be called and members from each chamber have the opportunity to iron out any differences. The constitutional deadline to hand the budget in to the governor is Friday, May 10.

Back row, from left: Rosemary Kenney, Instructor; Robert Cresanto of Mountain Home, AR; Jordan Miller of Mountain Home, AR; and Todd Mueller of Mountain Home, AR. Front row, from left:  Barbara Rhoden of Mountain Home, AR; Amanda Pence of Bull Shoals, AR; Cindy Hutchison of Clarkridge, AR; and Marla Bird of Isabella, MO.  JoAnn Thomas, Instructor (not pictured).

Back row, from left: Rosemary Kenney, Instructor; Robert Cresanto of Mountain Home, AR; Jordan Miller of Mountain Home, AR; and Todd Mueller of Mountain Home, AR. Front row, from left: Barbara Rhoden of Mountain Home, AR; Amanda Pence of Bull Shoals, AR; Cindy Hutchison of Clarkridge, AR; and Marla Bird of Isabella, MO. JoAnn Thomas, Instructor (not pictured).

(Mountain Home) – Arkansas State University-Mountain Home (ASUMH) recently held a ceremony honoring graduates of the Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) program.

Graduates completed 99 hours of course work and passed a skills and knowledge test to graduate. Students finished their course work in three weeks. ASUMH CNA Instructor Rosemary Kenney presented the graduates with their certificates.

For information on upcoming classes or scholarships, contact ASUMH Health Science Coordinator Sarah Smith at 870-508-6266 or email sarahs@asumh.edu.

Cherry blossoms of Prunus X yedoensis are white tinged with pink and bloom before the leaves emerge. They have a faint almond scent.

Cherry blossoms of Prunus X yedoensis are white tinged with pink and bloom before the leaves emerge. They have a faint almond scent.

by Marilyn Odneal, Horticulture Adviser

(Mountain Grove) – It is cherry blossom time! This reminds us that ornamental cherries are great additions to the landscape with lovely flowers, satiny bark, fruit that attracts and attractive foliage. They make nice specimen trees and are attractive in groups as well. Our group of cherry trees was planted at the Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station in 1999 and includes the Yoshino cherry, the Higan or Autumnalis cherry, the Okame cherry, and the Kwanzan or Kanzan cherry.

The Yoshino cherry, Prunus X yedoensis is the earliest blossoming of our group and is the cherry that is the most widely planted in Washington DC. It is winter cold hardy in zones 5 – 8 (Mountain Grove is in zone 6) and is native to Japan. It grows from 30 to 40 feet tall and wide. Its flowers are showy and fragrant and the leaves have good fall color.

The Higan or Autumalis cherry, Prunus subhirtella Autumnalis, is winter hardy in zones 4 – 8 and grows 20 -35 feet tall and 15 – 30 feet wide. It bears semi-double pink flowers in spring with another small show in fall – which is (you guessed it) why it is named Autumnalis. The Higan cherry is considered to be relatively more disease resistant.

The Okame cherry Prunus X incamp Okame bears rose-pink flowers in spring. It grows from 15 – 20 feet high and up to 20 feet wide. This tree is more commonly planted in the south and is reported to be winter cold hardy in the warmer parts of zone 6 (so we have been lucky that it has survived our winters so far).

The Kwanzan cherry, Prunus serrulata Kwanzan or Kwanzan (Kanzan) cherry usually blossoms 1 to 2 weeks later than the Yoshino cherry and therefore has a better chance of avoiding late spring freezes. Kwanzan grows to a height and spread of 25 to 30 feet. It bears deep pink double flowers. Of the four that we have planted at the experiment station, Kwanzan or Kanzan cherry is recommended for planting in Missouri by the Cooperative Extension Service as the hardiest and most reliable.

Cherry trees do best in full sun but some can tolerate part shade. They have medium moisture requirements but will not tolerate wet soils. They also may have insect and disease problems so they are not considered to be low maintenance. I am thinking of planting some in front of some evergreens in my yard – so the lovely blossoms will contrast with the dark green background.

For information for other flowering trees in Missouri, as well as a list of four ornamental cherries recommended for Missouri, see the online UMC Cooperative Extension guide “Selecting Landscape Plants: Flowering Trees” by Dr. Chris Starbuck at http://extension.missouri.edu/p/G6805

Direct comments or questions concerning this column to Marilyn Odneal via email at MarilynOdneal@missouristate.edu; write to Missouri State Fruit Experiment Station, 9740 Red Spring Road, Mountain Grove, Mo. 65711; or call (417) 547-7500. Visit our Web site at http://mtngrv.missouristate.edu.

Front Row, Left to Right – Jennifer Hicks, Steve Kellet , Tonya Jedlicka, Marcia Kerschen, Ron Gould, Ruby Collins, Mark Collins, Glen Johnson   Back Row, Left to Right  - Jim Laughary, Justin Hicks, Jay Hale, Randy Pace, Dr. John Mulford, Dr. Fred Czerwonka, Bo Pace, Ralph Whitsell, Jack Randolph

Front Row, Left to Right – Jennifer Hicks, Steve Kellet , Tonya Jedlicka, Marcia Kerschen, Ron Gould, Ruby Collins, Mark Collins, Glen Johnson Back Row, Left to Right – Jim Laughary, Justin Hicks, Jay Hale, Randy Pace, Dr. John Mulford, Dr. Fred Czerwonka, Bo Pace, Ralph Whitsell, Jack Randolph

(West Plains) – The West Plains High School Future Farmers of America students and their supporters have begun a “Raising the Barn” fundraising campaign to build a new agriculture science facility.

The “Raising the Barn” campaign aims to create an agriculture science facility that will give hands-on experience to the more than 200 students who take agricultural science classes at the high school each year. The proposed facility is set to be built on a vacant lot owned by the West Plains School District on Olden Street.

The current building is 8,400 square feet and is approximately 40 years old. The building limits program expansion and course offerings due to inadequate space of the facility. With the evolving need for more science based agriculture and the lack of current space available, a new facility will help meet the needs of educating tomorrow’s agriculturists.

When completed, the new facility will offer a 10,500 square foot space that supports current trends in agriculture and will provide a home for future growth. The increased space will allow for additional instructional staff, additional classrooms, lab space, expanded course offerings, and the potential implementation of an agriculture program for middle school grades.

“The Agriculture Science curriculum is evolving.” said Tonya Jedlicka, who teaches Agriculture Science at the West Plains High School. “We want our students to gain the hands on experience that is required to be successful in today’s agriculture industry. The Raising the Barn” campaign is going to enable us to be a fully functioning agriculture facility that we can be proud of. It’s not just going to help the 200 students we serve now, but the students in the next 20 years to come.”

The West Plains High School’s FFA club boasts more than 200 members, many of them on paths to enter careers in agricultural science or agribusiness.

Students will learn everything from the right way to trim a goat’s hooves to testing soil to the latest agriculture mechanics techniques. Jedlicka sees many of her students becoming interested in other aspects of agriculture, such as the emerging field of biotechnology, which spins off into diverse specialties from alternative fuel to pharmaceuticals.

“The new facility will offer more agricultural opportunities for students,” said Jedlicka. “The new agriculture science facility”, she said, “will help prepare them not only for the present, but for the future of agriculture as well.

Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports only 1 percent of the U.S. population list farming as their occupation, agriculture is still a crucial subject to study. In 1960, the average farmer fed 26 people, but today each farmer feeds an average of 155 people. U.S. farmers also provide 40 percent of the world’s corn supply.

“It’s a huge part of the economy here,” said Shawn Rhoads, 154th District Missouri State Representative. “The area is the second-largest cattle producer in Missouri. There’s an opportunity to grow Ag jobs and the Ag economy”.

The estimated cost of the project is estimated at $800,000. The West Plains Schools Board of Education has pledged $300,000 of district dollars to the Ag Building project. The balance will be funded through the “Raising the Barn” campaign. Donations can be one time or spread over a five year period.

Groundbreaking is set to begin summer of 2013.

A campaign brochure is available online at www.zizzers.org/agscience or one can be picked up at the West Plains Schools Board of Education Office at 305 Valley View Drive. For further more information on the “Raising the Barn” campaign, contact Tonya Jedlicka or Jay Hale at 256-6150. Anyone wishing to make a pledge is asked to make their check payable to the West Plains Schools and send it to 305 Valley View Drive, West Plains, MO 65775.

(Willow Springs) – Have you dreamed of meeting up with your friends or family at a cozy local tea shop where you could sip a cup of tea or coffee, snack on yummy treats, and browse beautiful arts, crafts, books and gifts made by local women in a relaxing, charming atmosphere?

“Coming Up Roses Tea Shop”, run by a spiritual women’s co-operative, will specialize in arts and crafts, treats including teas, coffee, soups, baked goods and chocolates as well as healing modalities. It will open its doors at 118 E. Main Street, Willow Springs on Thursday, May 2 at 10 AM. Ongoing hours will be Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays from 10 AM to 6 PM.

Art classes and healing treatments including massage, acupuncture, and stress release will be available by appointment.

The project is sponsored by Hearthaven retreat center of Willow Springs.

One of the organizers said “The vision is to have a space for women to share, support, sell and enjoy each other’s art, skills, inspirations, mission and callings. It will be a place where you can come to relax, visit, drink tea or coffee, meet friends, eat chocolate truffles, veggie wraps, homemade muffins, get a massage, crystal treatment, acupuncture, herbal remedies, spirit paintings, counseling and more.”

If you are a woman artist, crafter, healer, baker, etc. who might be interested in taking part, contact Hearthaven at 417-469-2658.

David Barbe, MD, and Les Hall, MD, interim dean of the University of Missouri School of Medicine. (Photo provided)

David Barbe, MD, and Les Hall, MD, interim dean of the University of Missouri School of Medicine. (Photo provided)

(Mountain Grove) – The University of Missouri School of Medicine and Medical Alumni Organization presented their most prestigious awards to graduates and supporters on Thursday, April 4, 2013, at The Kansas City Club. One of the Distinguished Service Awards was presented to David Barbe, MD. A graduate of the Class of 1980, Dr. Barbe is a Mercy family physician in his hometown of Mountain Grove, Mo., and regional division president of Mercy Clinic for southwest Missouri and northwest Arkansas, as well as chair-elect of the American Medical Association Board of Trustees.

After graduating from MU’s medical school, Dr. Barbe completed residency in family medicine at the University of Kansas’ affiliated program at St. Joseph Hospital in Wichita, Kan. Following residency, he returned to his hometown in southern Missouri and established a family medicine practice, which expanded to two sites with several physicians.

In 1999, Dr. Barbe merged his practice with Mercy Clinic (formerly St. John’s Clinic) in Springfield, Mo. He is now the regional division president of the integrated group, which consists of 650 physicians in 100 locations in southwest Missouri and northwest Arkansas. Dr. Barbe also serves on the executive council for Mercy health system, which was ranked No. 1 in the nation among Integrated Medical System’s Top Integrated Health Networks in 2007, 2009 and 2012.

Dr. Barbe has been a member of the American Medical Association (AMA), Missouri State Medical Association (MSMA) and American Academy of Family Physicians for more than 25 years. He was elected to the AMA Board of Trustees in 2009 and has served as a member of the MSMA board continuously for more than 20 years, serving as chair in 2003 and president in 2005. He was a delegate from Missouri to the AMA from 1997 to 2009 and is past chair of the delegation. Dr. Barbe served two terms on the AMA Council on Medical Service, serving as its chair from 2008 to 2009. During his tenure on the council, he participated in the development of much of the AMA policy on coverage of the uninsured, health care system reform, Medicare reform and health insurance market reform.

Dr. Barbe has been honored for his service in family medicine by receiving the Missouri Family Physician of the Year Award in 1993. He was also instrumental in expanding MU’s Rural Track Pipeline Program to southwest Missouri, and he serves as an important advocate for MU’s plan to increase medical student class size by creating a clinical campus in Springfield.

(Photo provided)

(Photo provided)

(West Plains) – In honor of Earth day, the West Plains High School Earth Science classes of Cindy Wright and Steve Roseman were looking for a community service project that met three criteria: free, local, and good for the community with long lasting benefits.

The students picked up trash out of Howell Creek near the high school. Wright said the combined efforts of all the classes involved in the cleanup filled one truck bed and a school dumpster with trash.

The classes recently started learning about rivers and streams.